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I need to update my address and other information with the court.

Court Basics

This guide tells you how and when to update your address and other personal information with the court and other parties in a Texas court case.
Overview

Guide Overview

You must give the court and the other side written notice of your current address if it changes during or after your case.

This rule applies to all types of Texas court cases.

Research Tips

Start by reading this article: Changing Your Address or Employment Information. You can read the law here: Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code 30.015

Common questions about Court Basics

Yes. The law says that you must provide the court and the other side with written notice of your current address if it changes during your case. (This rule applies to all cases.)

Read the law here: Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code 30.015.

Keeping your address up-to-date while your case is pending is the only way to make sure you will get notice of papers filed in your case, hearing and trial dates, and of any orders made.

If you fail to keep your address up-to-date, the other side or the court may notify you of important deadlines at an old address. Without having an up-to-date address on file, you risk losing important rights (such as having a chance to respond to the other side or to show up in court at a hearing or at your final trial).

In addition, the law requires you to keep your address up-to-date. If you fail to do so, you can be fined and penalized.

Provide it to:

  • The court clerk in the county that your court order was issued from,
  • The State Case Registry,
  • The Office of the Attorney General (if applicable), and
  • Other parties (or to their lawyers if they have lawyers).

Generally, sending your current contact information to the parties in your case is required by Texas law.

There are exceptions to the general rule (including, for example, when providing the information would impact the health, safety, or liberty of the child, or when disclosing the information would result in harassment or serious harm to yourself, or to your children). Talk with a lawyer if you have questions.

Yes, you must notify the court and others of current information in most family law cases involving children.
Note: This rule does not apply to termination of parental rights cases, or to adoptions. See Texas Family Code 105.006(a). This rule also does not apply if the court finds that providing this notice “would be likely to expose the child or the party to harassment, abuse, serious harm or injury.” See Texas Family Code 105.007.

Instructions & Forms

Follow these steps to notify the court and the other side in your court case if your address changes while the case is pending (or, after the case).

Checklist Steps

Fill out the form completely in blue or black ink.

Note: If you do not have a Texas drivers license number, provide your Texas identification number, or your out-of-state drivers license number if you don't live in Texas.

Sign and date the certificate of service to show how you will give the other side’s lawyer (or the other side if the other side does not have a lawyer) a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address form.

File (turn in) the Notice of Current Address at the clerk’s office and get a copy for both you and the other side.

You might be able to file the form with the clerk's office electronically. See TexasLawHelp's I want to electronically file (e-file) my documents guide to learn how.

Send a file-stamped copy of the Notice of Current Address to the other side on the same day you file it. If the other side has a lawyer, send it to the lawyer instead of directly to the other side.

Send it by:

  1. Fax,
  2. Email,
  3. Commercial delivery service (such as FedEx or UPS),
  4. Personal delivery, or
  5. Certified mail, return receipt requested, and regular mail. (This way may take too long.)

If you pay or receive child support, or if you have a child who receives public benefits such as food stamps, Medicaid, or CHIP, you need to tell the Office of the Attorney General Child Support Division about changes in your address and employer.

Send a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address form to the State Case Registry and to the Office of the Attorney General if it is involved in your case. You will need the mailing address for the State Case Registry. See the “Notice to the State Case Registry” section of your orders (if applicable) for the address. For most cases, the address is: State Case Registry, Contract Services Section, MC046S, P.O. Box 12017, Austin, Texas 78711-2017.

Mailing address for the field office of the Office of the Attorney General Child Support Division (OAG Child Support Division) that serves the county where your court orders are issued from.

Send By Email - You can scan a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address and email it to the OAG Child Support Division. Find the email address for the child support office in your county here: Email Addresses for Child Support Offices. Write the cause number and the county where your case is pending in the subject line of the email. Print a copy of your email. Bring it with you when it is time to finish your case.

Send By Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested. Or, you can mail a copy of your Notice of Current Address by certified mail return receipt requested. The post office has the forms for certified mail return receipt requested. Find the mailing address for the child support office in your county here: Mailing Addresses for Child Support Offices. The post office will give you a receipt when you mail the Notice of Current Address. The child support office will sign the return receipt (often called the “green card”) and mail it back to you. Bring the receipt and the return receipt (green card) with you when it’s time to finish your case.

Forms Required

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