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Grandparents & Other Nonparent Caregivers

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This toolkit tells you how to ask for a custody, visitation, child support and medical support order if (1) you are a grandparent or other nonparent, and (2) there are no existing court orders about the child. FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This article about amending petitions in family law matters was written by Texas Legal Services Center.
This article provides an overview of attorneys ad litem and amicus attorneys in family law cases.  
A parent can sign an “Authorization Agreement” form to give a close relative or approved nonrelative the authority to care for and make decisions for a child. Unlike a court order, an Authorization Agreement can be cancelled by the parent at any time.
This article answers frequently asked questions about changing an existing custody, visitation, child support or medical support order. LINK TO FORMS INCLUDED.
In Texas, the legal word for child custody is “conservatorship.” This article tells you about child custody/conservatorship in Texas, including how to file or respond to a custody case. LINKS TO FORMS INCLUDED.
Unless you meet certain legal requirements, you must wait at least a year before going back to court to change primary custody of a child. This article tells you about those legal requirements. LINK TO FORMS INCLUDED.
This article tells you about child support, medical support, and dental support in Texas, including how to get or change a child support order. LINK TO FORMS INCLUDED.   
In Texas, a visitation order is called a “possession order.” This article tells you about possession orders, including how get or change a possession order. SAMPLE POSSESSION ORDER FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This article contains information on a way certain non-parents can be allowed to consent to medical treatment of a minor child. This article was developed by the Texas Kincare Taskforce. Links to a FORM to consent to medical treatment by a non-parent is included. 
This article tells you about court fees and fee waivers. FEE WAIVER FORM INCLUDED.
This article contains answers to common questions about how to get court-ordered temporary authority to care of a child. This article was written by Texas Legal Services Center. 
This interactive handbook by the Supreme Court of Texas Permanent Judicial Commission for Children, Youth and Families describes what happens when CPS investigates a family or removes a child from the home. What are your rights? Who are all the different people working on the case? What can you expect when you go to court? What...
This article tells you how to file an answer in a family law case (such as a divorce, custody, paternity, or modification case). ANSWER FORMS ARE INCLUDED.   
This article tells you how to serve the initial court papers in a family law case (such as a divorce, custody, modification, child's name change, or paternity case).  
This article contains information on kinship placements. When a child is removed from his or her biological parents, Child Pro- tective Services (“CPS”) will try to place the children with a family member first. This is called “kinship care” or “relative care.” A benefit of kinship placement is that the child will be able to...
This article discusses serving incarcerated persons in Texas with citation and documents in a family law case.  
This article explains how you serve a family law respondent who lives in Mexico.  
This article explains the use of standing orders in some Texas counties. A standing order is a court order that automatically takes effect (starts) when a case is filed.