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Divorce

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This article provides an overview of the inventory and appraisement, which is a document that lets the court know what property needs to be divided in a divorce.   
This article was prepared by Legal Aid of Northwest Texas and contains material from other resources as well. It contains a general overview of bankruptcy and is not a substitute for direct representation by an attorney.
This article answers questions about parental visitation rights at a child's school.
This article provides information for those representing themselves in a simple (uncontested) divorce, along with discussions about division of marital property and issues concerning children. Also provides tips on court etiquette and deadlines. It was written by the Texas Young Lawyers Association.  
This article contains a guide with information and resources for people representing themselves in a divorce, with resources and information specific to the Dallas, Texas, area. This article was written by the Dallas Bar Association.   
This article addresses same-sex marriage in Texas. 
This article tells you about service by posting. To print out both the instructions and forms, click here.   
This article tells you how to serve the other parent by publication. For the instructions and forms combined for publication in a divorce with children, click here. 
This article explains how you serve a family law respondent who lives in Mexico.  
This article contains a link to a tool designed to allow you to input the details of your visitation and custody order and generate a customized calendar of the visitation and custody dates to print out. This was created by Texas Legal Services Center.   
This article explains the use of standing orders in some Texas counties. A standing order is a court order that automatically takes effect (starts) when a case is filed.  
This article tells you about temporary orders and temporary restraining orders (TROs) in family law cases.   
Texas does not have legal separation, so this article explains how to protect your legal rights when you are not, for whatever reason, ready to divorce.  
This handbook tells you about Harris County family courts and other family law issues.
This article tells you general information on what to do and not to do in a courtroom.