hide my visit

Child Custody & Visitation

Follow these steps to search for legal information and forms.

Step 2: Choose a Toolkit or Article.

A Toolkit includes Forms, Instructions, Frequently Asked Questions and related Articles. Toolkits have this symbol:

An Article provides basic information about a topic. Some Articles include Forms. Articles have this symbol:

This toolkit tells you how to change (modify) an existing custody, visitation, child support or medical support order. FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This toolkit tells you about your options if your child’s other parent (or someone else) has filed a modification case to change an existing custody, visitation or child support order. ANSWER FORM INCLUDED.
This toolkit tells you how to ask for a custody, visitation, child support and medical support order if (1) you are a grandparent or other nonparent and (2) there are no existing court orders about the child. FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This toolkit tells you how to ask for a custody, visitation, child support and medical support order if (1) you and the other parent are not married (or don’t want a divorce), (2) you and the other parent have signed an “Acknowledgment of Paternity” and (3) there are no existing court orders about your child.
A parent can sign an “Authorization Agreement” form to give a close relative or approved nonrelative the authority to care for and make decisions for a child. Unlike a court order, an Authorization Agreement can be cancelled by the parent at any time. LINK TO FORM INCLUDED.
This article answers frequently asked questions about changing an existing custody, visitation, child support or medical support order. LINK TO FORMS INCLUDED.
In Texas, the legal word for child custody is “conservatorship.” This article tells you about child custody/conservatorship in Texas, including how to file or respond to a custody case. LINKS TO FORMS INCLUDED.
Unless you meet certain legal requirements, you must wait at least a year before going back to court to change primary custody of a child. This article tells you about those legal requirements. LINK TO FORMS INCLUDED.
In Texas, a visitation order is called a “possession order.” This article tells you about possession orders, including how get or change a possession order. SAMPLE POSSESSION ORDER FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This article contains answers to common questions about clarifying visitation orders. This article was written by the Texas Legal Services Center. 
This article tells you about court fees and fee waivers. FEE WAIVER FORM INCLUDED.
This article explains what to expect if you are ordered to appear in a IV-D Court (also known as child support court). This article should not be considered legal advice, and doesn’t replace legal advice. It won’t explain every legal action that can happen in IV-D Court—just the most common ones.
This article explains what to expect if you are ordered to appear in a IV-D Court (also known as child support court). This article should not be considered legal advice, and doesn’t replace legal advice. It won’t explain every legal action that can happen in IV-D Court—just the most common ones.
This article answers frequently asked questions about your rights to possession of a child when you have a court order for possession but the child’s parent refuses to return the child.  
This article contains answers to common questions about how to get court-ordered temporary authority to care of a child. This article was written by Texas Legal Services Center. 
This article tells you how to file an answer in a family law case (such as a divorce, custody, paternity or modification case). ANSWER FORMS ARE INCLUDED.
This article contains a link to a tool designed to allow you to input the details of your visitation and custody order and have a full customized calendar of the visitation and custody dates print out. This article was designed by the Texas Legal Services Center. 
This article explains the use of standing orders in some Texas counties. A standing order is a court order that automatically takes effect (starts) when a case is filed.
This article tells you about temporary orders and temporary restraining orders (TROs) in family law cases.
This handbook tells you about Harris County family courts and other family law issues.