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Changing Your Address or Employment Information

This article tells you how and when to update your address and other personal information with the court and others. FORMS ARE INCLUDED.

Do I have to notify the court and the other side if my address changes while my case is pending?

Yes. The law says that you must provide the court and the other side with written notice of your current address if it changes during your case. (This rule applies to all cases.)

Read the law here: Tex. Civ. Prac. & Rem. Code § 30.015.

How do I notify the court and other side if my address changes while my case is pending?

Step 1: Fill out a Notice of Current Address form.

  • Fill out the form completely in blue or black ink.
    • Note: If you do not have a Texas drivers license number, provide your Texas identification number, or your out-of-state drivers license number if you don't live in Texas.
  • Sign and date the certificate of service to show how you will give the other side’s lawyer (or the other side if the other side does not have a lawyer) a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address form. 

Step 2: File

File (turn in) the Notice of Current Address at the clerk’s office and get a copy for both you and the other side.

Step 3: Send

Send a file-stamped copy of the Notice of Current Address to the other side on the same day you file it. If the other side has a lawyer, send it to the lawyer instead of directly to the other side. Send it:

  1. by fax, or
  2. by email, or
  3. by commercial delivery service (such as FedEx or UPS), or
  4. by personal delivery, or
  5. by certified mail, return receipt requested and regular mail. (This way may take too long.)

Step 4:  (If Applicable) -State Case Registry/Office of Attorney General

  • (If applicable). Send a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address form to the State Case Registry and to the Office of the Attorney General if it is involved in your case. You will need the:
    • Mailing address for the State Case Registry.
      • See the “Notice to the State Case Registry” section of your orders (if applicable) for the address. For most cases, the address is:
        • State Case Registry, Contract Services Section, MC046S, P.O. Box 12017, Austin, Texas 78711-2017
    • Mailing address for the field office of the Office of the Attorney General Child Support Division (OAG Child Support Division) that serves the county where your court orders issued from.
  • Send By Email - You can scan a file-stamped copy of your Notice of Current Address and email it to the OAG Child Support Division. Find the email address for the child support office in your county here: Email Addresses for Child Support Offices. Write the cause number and the county where your case is pending in the subject line of the email. Print a copy of your email. Bring it with you when it is time to finish your case.
  • Send By Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested – Or, you can mail a copy of your Notice of Current Address by certified mail return receipt requested. The post office has the forms for certified mail return receipt requested. Find the mailing address for the child support office in your county here: Mailing Addresses for Child Support Offices. The post office will give you a receipt when you mail the Notice of Current Address. The child support office will sign the return receipt (often called the “green card”) and mail it back to you. Bring the receipt and the return receipt (green card) with you when it’s time to finish your case.

 

Why is it important to keep my address up-to-date while my case is pending?

Keeping your address up-to-date while your case is pending is the only way to make sure you will get notice of papers filed in your case, hearing and trial dates, and of any orders made.

If you fail to keep your address up-to-date, the other side or the court may notify you of important deadlines at an old address. Without having an up-to-date address on file, you risk losing important rights (such as having a chance to respond to the other side or to show up in court at a hearing or at your final trial).

In addition, the law requires you to keep your address up-to-date. If you fail to do so, you can be fined and penalized.

What if I’m concerned about the other side having my contact information?

Generally, sending your current contact information to the parties in your case is required by Texas law.

There are exceptions to the general rule (including, for example, when providing the information would impact the health, safety, or liberty of the child, or when disclosing the information would result in harassment or serious harm to yourself, or to your children). Talk with a lawyer if you have questions.

Note: Texas Family Code § 105.006(c) sets out exceptions that apply to final orders in certain cases involving children:

  • If, after notice and hearing, a judge finds that providing your contact information to the other side is likely to subject you (the conservator) or your child to harassment, abuse, serious harm, injury, or family violence, the judge may:

            (1)  order the information not to be provided to the other party; or

            (2)  issue any other necessary orders.

There may be other issues involved in your case. Find out more in the Protection from Violence or Abuse section of this website. 

Do I have to notify the court and others if my address, employment or other personal information changes after my case is finished?

Yes, you must notify the court and others of current information in most family law cases involving children.


Note: This rule does not apply to termination of parental rights cases, or to adoptions. Read the law here: Tex. Family Code § 105.006(a). This rule also does not apply if the court finds that providing this notice “would be likely to expose the child or the party to harassment, abuse, serious harm or injury.” Read the law here: Tex. Family Code § 105.007.

Who do I have to notify of changes after my case is finished?

Provide it to:

  • The court clerk in the county that your court order was issued from,
  • The State Case Registry,
  • The Office of the Attorney General (if applicable), and
  • Other parties (or to their lawyers if they have lawyers)

How do I notify the court and others if my address or employer’s address changes after my case is finished?

Step 1: Fill out the appropriate form:

Step 2File

File (turn in) the Notice of Current Address or Notice of Employer’s Address form at the clerk’s office and get a copy for both you and the other side.

  • File the form as soon as possible after you learn that your contact information or your employer’s contact information will be changing, but no later than:
    • on or before the sixtieth (60th) day before the intended change (if you are aware of the intended change 60 days ahead of time), or
    • on or before the fifth (5th) day after the date you know of the change (if you do not know or could not have known of the changed information sixty (60) days ahead of time).

Step 3: Send

Send a file-stamped copy of the Notice of Current Address or Notice of Employer’s Address form to the other side on the same day you file it. If the other side has a lawyer, send it to the lawyer instead of directly to the other side. Send it:

  1. by fax, or
  2. by email, or
  3. by commercial delivery service (such as FedEx or UPS), or
  4. by personal delivery, or
  5. by certified mail, return receipt requested and regular mail. (This way may take too long.)

 

What if I become unemployed?

Update the court and others in writing by filling out a Notice of Employer’s Address, stating that you are unemployed.

  • Check the box “I am unemployed” on the Notice of Employer’s Address form.
  • File (turn in) the Notice of Employer’s Address form with the clerk
  • Send a file-stamped copy of the form to the other parties in your case, and the State Case Registry. Send it:
  1. by fax, or
  2. by email, or
  3. by commercial delivery service (such as FedEx or UPS), or
  4. by personal delivery, or
  5. by certified mail, return receipt requested and regular mail. (This way may take too long.)
  • Keep proof you have kept the court and others informed of your updated information.

Note: It is common to see "unemployed" listed in the “information regarding the parties” section. Your employment status is relevant in most family law proceedings. The consequences of failing to update this information could be serious for you. If you have questions, talk with a lawyer.

Why is it important to keep my address, employment and other personal information up-to-date after my case is finished?

The law requires it.

  • Your custody, child support, or divorce decree is a court order that sets out rules you must follow even after your case is finished. If you do not follow a court order, you could be held in contempt of court. You also run the risk of being penalized, subject to jail time, and having to pay court costs and attorney’s fees.

It impacts child support payment processing.

  • If you were ordered to pay child support to the Attorney General (or applicable government agency), you will need to provide your employer’s contact information so it can garnish (take out) child support from your wages.
  • If you are receiving child support, providing this information will help to make sure that the child support money goes to the right place.

It can impact the location for exchange of children for visitation.

  • Keeping your address up-to-date is particulalrly important if your residence is listed in the order as the place for exchange of children for visitation. If you fail to notify the other parent or conservator of the change of address, visitation can be impacted.

It protects your legal right to notice.

  • If any parties in the case want to have a judge enforce, clarify or change anything about the order, they will have to file a petition. To protect your right to receive notice of court papers or deadlines, make sure your contact information stays up-to-date.

Guided Form

Click the link below for a guided form for a Notice of Current Address.

Click Here