Texas

Texas Supreme Court Approved Divorce Forms -- Uncontested, No Minor Children, No Real Property

Authored By: Texas Supreme Court
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On November 13, 2012, the Texas Supreme Court approved a set of forms for use in uncontested divorces that do not involve children or real property (an example of real property is a house that you and your spouse own). 

 

You do not have to use these forms, but if you choose to use them, the court cannot refuse to accept them just because they are fill-in-the-blank forms or because you do not have a lawyer.  The judge could still refuse to accept these forms if they are not properly filled out. 

 

 This Divorce Set contains instructions and seven forms: an Affidavit of Indigency, an Original Petition for Divorce, a Waiver of Service, a Final Decree of Divorce, a Certificate of Last Known Address, a Notice of Change of Address, and an Affidavit of Military Status. The instructions describe each form and when to use a particular form.

 

It is always best to hire a lawyer. To get a referral to a lawyer call the State Bar of Texas Lawyer Referral Information Service at 1-800-252-9690.  Click here for information on how to select a lawyer.

 

If you qualify, legal aid may also be able to help you, please click here, for more informaiton on legal aid, in your area.

 

If you are a victim of domestic violence, you can get legal help by calling  the Family Violence Legal Line at 1-800-374-4673. Click here for more information on this service.

 

If you are low income, you may be able to talk to an attorney online by live chat at www.TexasLawHelp.org.  The chat service is online from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Monday through Friday, click here to chat now.

 

Divorce Forms Set One -- Uncontested, No Minor Children, No Real Property -- Instructions and Forms

 

Supreme Court Order Approving Uniform Forms -- Divorce Set One

 

General Feedback About the Forms

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