Texas

Landlord-Tenant

Legal Resources

  • Subleases

    Read this to find out what a "sublease" is and the pitfalls of "subletting." Content Detail

    By:
    Texas Tenants Advisor
  • Sue Your Landlord

    Suing your landlord is relatively easy. The hard part is knowing when to sue your landlord. Always try to work out any problems with your landlord. If that doesn't work, this will guide you through the process of suing your landlord in small claims court. This document give a general overview. There are also forms on Texas Tenant Advisor for many of the specific topics listed there and on TexasLawHelp, so first look to see if your problem is addressed. Content Detail

    By:
    Texas Tenants Advisor
  • Texas Tenants Advisor

    Content Detail

    By:
    Texas Low Income Housing Information Service
  • Utilities

    Special rules for utilities apply for renters. These rules mainly apply to the landlord. Read this if you are a renter and are having problems with your utilities that may be related to your landlord. If the problem is with your utility company, you should contact the utility or the Public Utility Commission's Customer Protection Division. Content Detail

    By:
    Texas Tenants Advisor
  • Who Owns the Property?

    Who owns the property where you are renting? As a tenant, you have right to know who owns the property and the name and address of the management company (if there is one) that runs the property. Read this to find out more. Content Detail

    By:
    Texas Tenants Advisor
  • Eviction from Mobile Home Parks

    If you own your mobile home and are renting a lot from a mobile home park, you have additional protections if you face the threat of eviction. Of course, you should try to talk to your landlord to see if you can resolve your differences. Your interest may be better served if you work something out without having to go to court. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Evictions in Justice of the Peace (J.P.) Court

    If you are being threatened with eviction, you should try to talk to your landlord to see if you can resolve your differences. Your interests may be better served if you work something out with the landlord without having to go to court. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Finding Out Who Owns the Property

    As a tenant, you have the right to know the name and address of the owner of the premises. You also have the right to know the name and street address of any property management company that is managing your house or apartment. The landlord may satisfy the duty of disclosure by providing you with a written copy of the information, by having the information posted continuously in a conspicuous place in the apartment complex or resident manager's office, or by having the information included in your copy of the written lease agreement or house rules. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Landlord and Tenants Guide

    Content Detail

    By:
    Real Estate Center -- Mays Business School
  • Landlord Claims Against You for Debt

    If your former landlord claims you owe a debt as a result of your tenancy, you should contact the landlord with a proposal for resolving this matter. Often landlords are willing to accept less than the amount they originally say you owe. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Landlord Seizure of Property

    Under Texas law, a landlord cannot seize any of your property for delinquent rent unless you have a written lease that allows such action (enforcing a landlord lien) and that section is underlined or in conspicuous bold print. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Right to Summon Police

    A landlord may not prohibit or limit a tenant's right to summon police or other emergency assistance in response to family violence. Read More

    By:
    Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Application Deposit Refund Demand Letter and Application Fee/Deposit Information.

    If you are trying to get your application deposit and or fee returned to you, this form can help. It has the applicable law and a pre-written fill in the blank letter you can send to request your application deposit and/or fee back. As always, before sending this form, make sure to review the applicable law. Applicable law includes Sections 92.3515, 92.352, and 92.354 of the Texas Property Code. Also, please review the application deposit/application fee information below as well. Read More

    By:
    Austin Tenant's Council